Genetic algorithm

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genetic algorithm , in artificial intelligence. a type of evolutionary computer algorithm in which symbols (often called “genes” or “chromosomes”) representing possible solutions are “bred.” This “breeding” of symbols typically includes the use of a mechanism analogous to the crossing-over process in genetic recombination and an adjustable mutation rate. A fitness function is used on each generation of algorithms to gradually improve the solutions in analogy to the process of natural selection. The process of evolving the genetic algorithms and automating the selection is known as genetic programming. In addition to general software, genetic algorithms are sometimes used in research with artificial life. cellular automatons. and neural networks .

Although not the first to experiment with genetic algorithms, John Holland did much to develop and popularize the field with his work in the early 1970s at the University of Michigan. As described in his book, Adaptation in Natural and Artificial Systems (1975; revised and expanded 1992), he devised a method, or schema theorem, for evaluating each generation of genetic algorithms. John Koza, one of Holland’s doctoral students and a holder of more than a dozen patents related to genetic programming, was one of the first to develop commercial applications of the field, as a founder of a company known as Scientific Games. Koza shared his programming experiences in a sequence of books beginning with Genetic Programming: On the Programming of Computers by Means of Natural Selection (1992).

One difficulty often encountered in genetic programming is that of the algorithms becoming stuck in the region of a reasonably good solution (a “locally optimal region”) rather than finding the best solution (a “global optimum”). Overcoming such evolutionary dead ends sometimes requires human intervention. In addition, genetic programming is computationally intensive. During the 1990s programming techniques for it had not developed sufficiently to justify the expensive use of supercomputers. which limited applications to rather simplistic problems. However, as cheaper personal computers became more powerful, genetic programming began having notable commercial success in circuit design, data sorting and searching, and quantum computing. In addition, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) used genetic programming in the design of antenna s for the Space Technology 5 Project, which involved three “micro-satellites” launched in 2006 for monitoring the effects of solar activity on Earth’s magnetosphere.

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