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  • Straight Through -vs- Cross-Over: How to tell whether an ethernet cable is a straight-through or cross-over cable. Most standard ethernet cables are straight-through cables.
    • Straight through is a CAT-5, CAT-5e, or CAT-6 Ethernet Cable with the wires connected as follows:

    On both ends: Orange Stripe; Orange; Green Stripe; Blue; Blue Stripe; Green; Brown Stripe; Brown.

  • Cross-over is a CAT-5, CAT-5e, or CAT-6 Ethernet Cable with the wires connected as follows:

    On one end: Orange Stripe; Orange; Green Stripe; Blue; Blue Stripe; Green; Brown Stripe; Brown.

    On the other end: Green Stripe; Green; Orange Stripe; Blue; Blue Stripe; Orange; Brown Stripe; Brown.

  • The above conforms to TIA/EIA-568 standard. However, all that is important for a cross-over to work is for pins 1 & 2 (transmit) to switch places with pins 3 & 6 (receive) on the opposite end. For a straight through, pins should be the same on both ends.
  • Color sets (ex. Orange Strip & Orange) mark twisted pairs. Keeping pin sets on the same twisted pair (i.e. pins 1 & 2 on one color set, and pins 3 & 6 on another) allows best signal quality.
  • Note: TIA/EIA standard has not been established for CAT-7 or greater cabling.
  • For more information see: How to Make a Network Cable
  • If planning to connect 3 or more computers, hubs are less expensive, but waste bandwidth by repeating all signals out all ports. Switches allow more efficient use of bandwidth by sending packets only

    to the intended recipient.

  • To share your files, right click on any folder and choose Sharing to make them shared.
  • You can also do this with your printers to be able to print from one computer while the printer is connected to the other.
  • Many computers can determine if you are using a crossover or straight through cable. If you are not so lucky to have auto-sensing on at least one of the devices connected by a cable, you must use the correct type between them. Computer-to-switch/hub will require a straight through, computer-to-computer a crossover.
  • Check to see if your computer has an Ethernet Adapter in the back of the computer. Most new computers have this. You can tell by the documentation from the computer or by looking at the back of the computer. It looks like a phone jack, but larger, with 8-pins. Do not confuse this with a "modem" jack for dial-up phone service. Phone/modem jacks will have 2, 4 or 6 pins.
  • Notes on network and IP addresses. IPv4 (IP ver. 4) addresses are written like this: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (four number groups separated by three dots). This is the case for all RFC-1166 compliant countries. Each number ranges from 0 to 255. This is known as "Dotted Decimal Notation" or "Dot Notation" for short. The address is divided into two portions: the network portion and the host portion.
    • Classful networks. The network and host portions are as follows: "n" represents the network portion and "x" represents the host portion.
    • Class A networks. The first number is between 1 to 126. 127 is a loop back subnet used to refer back to your NIC card). Example: nnn.xxx.xxx.xxx (ex. 10.xxx.xxx.xxx)
    • Class B networks. When the first number is 128 to 191. Example:nnn.nnn.xxx.xxx (ex. 172.16.xxx.xxx)
    • Class C networks. When the first number is 192 to 223. Example: nnn.nnn.nnn.xxx (ex. 192.168.1.xxx)
  • Source: www.wikihow.com

    Category: How to computer

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